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  • Plans set for 2017 Week of Prayer

    Lay representatives from congregations involved in the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity”gathered recently to begin planning for the 18th series of celebrations.The dates chosen were Jan. 16 through Jan. 20, 2017. The hosting congregations and their co-hosts were paired up.• Jan. 16 will be at First Presbyterian with Shepherd of the Desert as co-host.• Jan. 17 will be at St. Elizabeth Seton with St. Joachim & St. Anne as co-host.• Jan. 18 will be at The Church of the Palms with Faith Presbyterian as co-host.• Jan. 19 will be at All Saints of the Desert Episcopal with St. Christopher’s Episcopal as co-host.

  • Water heater fire forces Glendale family out

    A water heater fire that sparked Saturday has forced a family out of their home.Glendale firefighters responded to a home near 51st and W. Peoria avenues. Fire officials said a water heater in an apartment on the second floor caught fire.Flames spread to the attic before firefighters were able to get everything under control.The family will be displaced, and one firefighter was taken to the hospital for treatment of heat-related issues.Officials did not immediately have an estimate of the damage caused by the fire.

  • Brush up on Surprise fireworks laws for July 4

    Surprise, A‌riz. - With Fourth of July fast approaching, be sure you know the laws regarding the use and sale of fireworks within the City of Surprise.Here’s a quick overview:The minimum age for purchasing consumer fireworks is 16.Consumer fireworks use is allowed on private property within city limits, with the property owner’s consent, during these dates only: June 24 – July 6 and December 24 – January 3.Consumer fireworks use is prohibited January 4 – June 23 and July 7 – December 23.While the use of consumer fireworks is permitted on private property within the city limits, it is still illegal to use consumer fireworks anywhere on public property, including areas like streets, sidewalks and parks.

  • Glendale PD: Removed locking device allowed toddler to wander out

    GLENDALE, Ariz. – A toddler found wandering around her family’s apartment complex Friday got out after a locking device was removed from her front door, police said.The 3-year-old girl was found in good health by a neighbor in the complex at 6802 N. 67th Ave. around 8 a.m. and was in sleepwear.Police later located the girl’s guardian, who lives in the complex, and said the family was unaware the child had left the residence.The child was with the Police Department’s victim’s advocate’s office.Meanwhile, police said it is unknown whether the family has any history with the Arizona Department of Child Safety.

  • UPDATE: Missing Peoria couple found safe

    PEORIA, Ariz. – Police say a missing elderly couple suffering from dementia and memory issues have been located and are safe and healthy.Josiah Bristol, 93, and his wife Irene, 85, were spotted around 8:30 a.m. near 98th Avenue and Bell Road in Sun City by a member of the public who had seen media coverage publicizing their disappearance Thursday afternoon, police said. They have been reunited with family, police added.The Bristols had last been seen at Irene’s residence in the area of 9300 W. Thunderbird Road in Sun City around 4:30 p.m. Thursday.They were believed to have been in a white, 2015 GMC 1500 pickup truck, with Arizona license plate WCDJZ67. 

  • Glendale PD: Woman threatened store manager with metal rod while stealing food

    GLENDALE, Ariz. - A woman holding a 2-and-a-half foot metal rod, threatened a store manager as she walked away with food from the store, police said.Court records show that on June 19 around 5:20 a.m., the woman entered a Walgreens near 43rd and Glendale avenues, stealing the items while threatening the store manager with a 30-inch metal rod.Police said Dullalle Finney, 34, grabbed several food items and an ice cream bar, worth a total of $8.76. Finney was confronted by the store manager, when she allegedly held up the metal rod and said, "back up off me before I hit you with this."The manager called police while following Finney for a short distance. Police said they located her about two blocks away, still holding the metal rod.Police managed to recover the stolen food, except for the ice cream bar.Finney is facing charges of armed robbery and aggravated assault.

  • Riders rescued after coaster gets stuck at Castles N' Coasters

    The Phoenix Fire Department says it was able to safely rescue three people who became suspended dozens of feet in the air.Firefighters say the Desert Storm Roller Coaster at Castles N' Coasters, near I-17 and West Peoria Avenue, became stuck 60 to 70 feet in the air on Sunday.Employees were able to stabilize the roller coaster by tying off the front, preventing it from moving while the rescue was in progress.Firefighters were able to use a ladder to rescue the three people on board."This is a low-frequency, high-risk operation for firefighters since we don't see this happen often," said Capt. Reda Bigler in a news release. "Fire crews worked together to develop a plan and had technical rescue crews on scene in case this situation became more difficult."Stay with ABC15, abc15.com and ABC15 Mobile for updates.

  • Arizona authorities say 3 missing women met same man online

    With her Arizona home sold and most of her belongings packed up, Nancy Rae Hartz was ready to spend her golden years on the road. Having been divorced and then widowed, she had recently found love again through a dating website, and the happy couple was going to travel in an RV.When she left Kingman the morning of June 2, 2015, Hartz had a moment alone with her daughter."She said, 'Don't worry, baby. We'll keep in touch,'" daughter Denise Baggs recalls.Baggs spoke to her 72-year-old mother once on the phone three days later and hasn't heard from her since. Now authorities are trying to figure out if Hartz was the victim of a serial predator.Her disappearance echoes that of two other women, one in Arizona and one in Nevada. The three women lived within a roughly 100-mile radius of one another and were around the same age.Verna Clayton, who would be 73 now, was last seen in June 2008 in the small town of Dolan Springs, Arizona. Neva Jane Lindley, who would be 77 now, was last seen in November 2011 in Las Vegas. Both cashed out their financial assets just before they disappeared. Both had begun a relationship with a man they met online.Mohave County sheriff's detectives say 69-year-old Robert Lawson Carnochan was that man.Authorities investigating Hartz's disappearance learned the man she left with in the RV was using a stolen identity. When they finally located him in April, he was living in Yucca, about 20 miles south of Kingman, with another woman.In his possession were several aliases and firearms. Mohave County Sheriff's Chief Deputy Rodney Head said fingerprints confirmed the man was Carnochan, a Canadian citizen who fled to the U.S. illegally more than 20 years ago.Today, Carnochan sits in a Kingman jail on unrelated charges of identity theft, forgery and weapons violations. He told investigators that Hartz was alive when he dropped her off at a Kingman business in March. Head declined to identify the woman Carnochan was found living with but said she was unharmed.A search of his home turned up evidence that makes him a person of interest in the disappearances of all three women — Hartz, Clayton and Lindley, Head said."Until we can come up with some more evidence, we're just going to keep doing everything we possibly can to find these women and find out any information we can about that and Mr. Carnochan," Head said.Ting-Wei Chiang, Carnochan's public defender in the pending cases, declined to comment on his person-of-interest status."I will not make any comment about missing women," Chiang said. "So far, he has three open cases in Mohave County."Relatives of both Clayton and Lindley have declined requests to comment on the cases.Baggs said her mother, whose second husband died in 2001, decided to start dating again a few years ago. In June 2014, Hartz introduced her daughters to Carnochan.Baggs said she immediately disliked him.By March 2015, Hartz had put her home on the market and was closing her bank account. She was making plans to leave with Carnochan, who "wanted to live out in the middle of nowhere," Baggs said."All of us kids kept trying to tell Mom, 'Don't go,'" Baggs said. But her mother's response was that "she was in love with him, and she was going to go."Baggs reported her mother missing in July 2015. She said friends and family were alarmed when they received emails that did not sound like Hartz. They also received phone calls but the voice sounded nothing like Hartz, Baggs said.Deputies probed further after a woman claiming to be Hartz failed to show up to a scheduled meeting with investigators.Detective Scot Durst said in an email that calls to Hartz' phone were never answered.Detectives continue to investigate the women's disappearance and have served search warrants and subpoenas on financial institutions and social networks.Meanwhile, Baggs attends all of Carnochan's court appearances."I want him to tell me where he left my mother, and I know she's not alive," Baggs said.

  • Girl killed after she was hit by boat near beach

    BULLHEAD CITY, Ariz. (AP) — Bullhead City police say 13-year-old girl was killed after a boat crashed into a personal watercraft she was riding.Police say that the girl was on the personal watercraft near Davis Camp South beach about 12:37 p.m. Saturday when it was hit by a 20-foot boat driven by a 42-year-old man from Long Beach, California.Investigators say the girl was riding the personal watercraft with an 8-year-old girl, and it was driven by a 42-year-old woman from Colton, California.Police say the 13-year-old suffered head injuries and died after she was taken to Western Arizona Regional Medical Center, where she died. The driver of the personal watercraft suffered a collapsed lung and a broken arm and was taken to a hospital in Las Vegas. The 8-year-old girl had a large cut on her left arm, as well as a broken left hand, forearm and upper arm.Police say the driver of the boat was charged with operating a watercraft while intoxicated.

  • Deaf teacher's quest for armed service inspires students

    FREDERICK, Md. (AP) — Four teens in camouflage fatigues march briskly around a brick plaza at the Maryland School for the Deaf, silently marking their cadence in American Sign Language: "Left!" ''Left!"These members of the school's Cadet Corps aspire to military service, but their path is blocked. Deaf people are barred from joining the armed services, as corps creator Keith Nolan well knows. He's been told, "No," since 2001, when he tried to enlist in the Navy at age 18.Nolan is determined to change that."I want to show there are no barriers," he said through an interpreter.His determination has led to passage of a House bill bearing his name — the Keith Nolan Air Force Deaf Demonstration Act of 2015, which called for a demonstration program.The Defense Department declared in a report last month it would be "imprudent" to create a program assessing deaf people's fitness for military service. It cited the cost of equipment modifications, security risks from wireless assistive devices and the burden for nondisabled service members if their deaf counterparts can't perform the full range of military tasks.But Nolan, his cadets and his congressional supporters are undeterred."They're not taking us seriously," said Cadet Jennida Willoughby, 16, through a sign-language interpreter. "We're going to keep fighting back."During after-school and occasional weekend meetings, Cadet Corps members compete as teams in contests of physical strength and brainpower, and take turns leading problem-solving missions around town, said David Alexander, a school audiologist and Army veteran who helps to run the program. They've gone overnight camping, taken a field trip to the U.S. Military Academy and made a presentation to other students and faculty about the West Point visit.The cadet corps is independent, not affiliated with the military's Reserve Officer Training Corps.But Willoughby, an accomplished scuba diver, dreams of becoming a Navy SEAL.She and her fellow cadets, all rising seniors at the school 45 miles west of Baltimore, note along with Nolan that the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency has been hiring deaf workers since 1987. The agency, which analyzes aerial and satellite data, sent three deaf analysts to support U.S. military operations in Africa from 2012 to 2014, using only American Sign Language.And the military already has members in jobs that require sound-deadening earphones, such as guiding planes during landings and takeoffs from aircraft carriers."We can serve our country," said Cadet Blake Brewer, 17, whose older cousin is a Marine. "We can show what we can do."Although firearms training is barred by the school's no-weapons policy, Brewer said he's willing to take up arms for his country."I'm flexible with where they would need me," he said.Cadet Maverick Obermiller envisions himself as an engineer, one of the "supporting roles," including cybersecurity positions, that Nolan says should be open to deaf people.There's a precedent for deaf people in military service: The Israel Defense Forces have always recruited deaf volunteers and found ways for them to serve in uniform, spokeswoman Libby Weiss said in an email. She said the IDF communicates with deaf or hearing-impaired soldiers through adaptive devices, text messages, emails and lip-reading. In 2012, the IDF announced an Israeli sign-language course to help commanders communicate better with deaf and hearing-impaired soldiers, then numbering more than 100.Weiss said deaf service members are usually exempt from instructing roles, or jobs that would require them to communicate by telephone.Rep. Mark Takano, D-California, cites Israel's experience as one reason he will continue pressing for a U.S. demonstration program. Israel has "the benefit of a more diverse and talented pool of service members," Takano wrote in an email. "Their example shows that this policy can be effective in some of the most tense and dangerous military arenas."Sen. Kelly Ayotte, R-New Hampshire, said in an email that she, too, will continue pushing the Defense Department to see whether Americans with disabilities can serve and meet required military standards.Nolan, who teaches high-school government and history, said supporting the military in a civilian role isn't the same as serving in uniform, as one of his grandfathers and a great-uncle did.Nolan made it through two years of ROTC at California State University, Northridge, before being told his deafness made him ineligible for advancement.He founded the Maryland School for the Deaf Cadet Corps two years ago to teach skills he deems valuable no matter what career his students choose."I want to see them pave the way for the future," Nolan said. "I have done my part so far, but I want to see them take it and break through."

  • Britain's leaving the EU. What should I do with my money?

    As many people around the world are trying to wrap their minds around what just happened in Britain, you may also be wondering "What does the Brexit mean for my money?"If you are worried about your 401(k), take heart. Most experts say you shouldn't rush to sell stocks and some even say it's an opportunity to buy. And, bonus for those looking to borrow: rates may fall.Yes, things are going to be bumpy, but this is a time to stay calm and carry on.STOCKS AND RETIREMENTInvestors with heavy investments in the U.K. and Europe may have felt a sting Friday. U.S. stocks fell more than 3 percent but some European indexes fell over 12 percent.Market experts say the initial market reaction was largely emotional. But they noted that Britain's separation from the EU could take several years to play out and urged investors not to sell out of fear. And some said investors may even want to take advantage of the dip to buy."For the typical U.S. investor this is not really going to change anything," said Jurrien Timmer, director of global macro for Fidelity Investments. "It's not going to affect the U.S. economy, it's not going to tip us into recession."Expecting the worst, Robien Christie of Fort Worth, Texas, checked his 401(k) Friday morning for the first time in months."I was actually surprised," the 25-year old said. "I thought it would be bad but it's still positive for the year."He won't be touching his 401(k), but may put money into the British pound and into buying some stock in British companies as potential long-term investments.Others, meanwhile, said they weren't ready to face the impact."I just don't want to know right now," said Leah Jones of Chicago.The 39-year-old remembers sitting at her desk checking her retirement account when market crashed in 2008. She didn't want to relive that but plans to face it soon: She will call her financial adviser next week for some advice.Understandably, it was a day for worry for many.The VIX, known as the fear index, jumped from 17 to 25 Friday. That is far below the high of 80 it reached in October 2008 in the weeks that followed the collapse of Lehman Brothers."I think that things will work out over the long term. This isn't done in the short term ... the disappointment will roil the markets for a while," said John Manley, chief equity strategist at Wells Fargo Funds.Whether it's the downturn in the stock market or the increase in global uncertainty, these events are a reminder of the need for a thoughtful financial plan, said Mark Hamrick, senior economic analyst for Bankrate.com. That means setting aside adequate savings and having a diversified portfolio.If you don't have a financial adviser, look for information on the right investment choices for you with your retirement plan company."You need to have a plan that makes sense for you and you need to stick to that plan and that includes not freaking out when something like this happens," Timmer said.INTEREST RATESThe Federal Reserve has been slow to raise interest rates due to concerns over global economic instability, and the U.K. vote makes it even less likely the Fed will act soon.That's bad news for savers but great news for borrowers, particularly those looking to get a new mortgage or refinance.Anxious investors seeking the relative safety of U.S. bonds sent prices for the 10-year Treasury note sharply higher. In turn, that pulled the yield on the notes lower Friday. Because long-term mortgage rates tend to track the yield on notes, mortgage rates may fall further."Mortgage rates are tumbling now and they're approaching record-low levels," said Greg McBride, chief financial analyst at Bankrate.com. "If you're a borrower, don't wait to lock your rate as this opportunity may not last long."The average 30-year fixed-rate mortgage edged up this week to 3.56 percent from a 52-week low of 3.54 percent last week. How far rates drop and how long they stay there depends on the extent to which investors remain jittery."If markets bounce back next week, mortgage rates will too," McBride said. "But if the sell-off continues, mortgage rates will continue to fall."The prospect of a drop in mortgage rates has some homebuyers shifting gears.Zack Moore of Beaumont, California, says that, before Friday, he was ready to get prequalified on a home loan right away. But now he's going to hold off so that he can make sure to lock in a lower rate."If I see them drop at all, I may strike, I may try to wait a little while," said Moore, 41.The Brexit could also indirectly benefit other borrowers if the Fed holds off on raising the central bank's key benchmark interest rate. When that rate goes up, it can raise short-term borrowing costs for banks, and that can ultimately lead to higher rates on things such as credit cards, home equity loans and credit lines.

  • Items owned by gangster 'Whitey' Bulger up for auction

    BOSTON (AP) — A rat-shaped pencil holder and skull ring are just two of the hundreds of items belonging to gangster James "Whitey" Bulger to hit the auction block.The court-ordered auction in Bulger's South Boston hometown is an attempt to raise money for the families of his victims, including 20 people killed by Bulger and his gang.The Boston Globe reports (http://bit.ly/28UWwb0) Bulger's boxing mannequin was the first item up for bid at Saturday's auction at the Boston Convention & Exhibition Center. It sparked a bidding war before selling for $4,900. The rat-shaped mug sold for $3,600.More mundane items were also available, revealing Bulger's domestic life in hiding with his longtime girlfriend, Catherine Greig.The 86-year-old Bulger is serving a life sentence for a host of charges, including participating in 11 murders.

  • Killer sale: Fans flock to buy Jerry Lee Lewis items

    NESBIT, Miss. (AP) — There's a whole lot of sellin' going on at the home of rock 'n' roll pioneer Jerry Lee Lewis.An estate sale continued Saturday at Lewis' home in the Mississippi suburbs of Memphis, Tennessee.Lewis' son, Jerry Lee Lewis III, wrote on Facebook that his father and stepmother, Judith, aren't moving. But they want to sell excess furniture and memorabilia that the 81-year-old has accumulated during a career spanning seven decades.WMC-TV reports that fans came from as far away as Germany and Australia on Friday to try and buy something that had belonged to the pianist and singer. They were already lining up at 1:30 a.m.Some of the items for sale included vintage records, custom jackets, and a Rolls Royce.

  • Brexit, not the clothes, are the talk of Paris Fashion Week

    PARIS (AP) — The British vote to leave the European Union and not the clothes were the talk of the front row crowd at menswear shows in Paris on Friday.It started at Maison Margiela, a house for whom Briton John Galliano is at the creative helm, one of many examples of cross-pollination in European fashion.Galliano was not present at the somber show, with some fashion insiders commenting that the slow-beat Leonard Cohen soundtrack aptly defined the mood of many British attendees, all of whom The Associated Press spoke to were opposed to a British exit, or Brexit."It's terrible," repeated several top British fashion editors at the show in the storied Latin Quarter in Paris.Fashion is one of the global industries where Britons are at the forefront of power and influence — and so the Brexit vote was of particular interest. The most French of industries — haute couture — was even invented by an Englishman, Charles Frederick Worth, in the 19th century.Arguably the most powerful person in the industry is London-born U.S. Vogue Editor-in-Chief Anna Wintour, sister of the Guardian's diplomatic editor, Patrick Wintour. The Guardian, which has a big online presence, urged people to vote against Brexit.

  • Lucas abandons plan to build museum in Chicago after lawsuit

    CHICAGO (AP) — "Star Wars" creator George Lucas announced Friday that he has abandoned plans to build his art museum in Chicago, blaming delays over a lawsuit from a parks group opposed to development along the city's prized lakefront.The filmmaker said in a statement he would take his Lucas Museum of Narrative Art to his home state of California, but he did not name a specific location. He blamed Chicago's Friends of the Parks group for suing to stop construction on what is currently a parking lot for the NFL football stadium, Soldier Field."No one benefits from continuing their seemingly unending litigation to protect a parking lot," Lucas said. Friends of the Parks did not immediately respond to a request for comment.Mayor Rahm Emanuel and members of the city's cultural and business communities had backed the director's plans to bring the museum to the lakefront site, an area that is already home to a natural history museum, planetarium and aquarium. But it set off an impassioned fight with Friends of the Parks, which argued the museum plans violated laws restricting development along Lake Michigan.Emanuel released a statement Friday calling it a "missed opportunity" that would cost the city millions of dollars in economic investment, thousands of jobs and educational opportunities for the city's youth."Unfortunately, time has run out and the moment we've consistently warned about has arrived - Chicago's loss will be another city's gain," Emanuel said.The 17-acre site just south of the Chicago Bears' home stadium would have erased a parking lot and added 4.5 acres of new parkland, according to designs released in September. Supporters defended it as an improvement that would turn an asphalt expanse into green space with dazzling landscape design by renowned Chicago architect Jeanne Gang.They said the museum's futuristic building — a sloping dune-like form topped with an observation deck resembling a floating disc —would have added to Chicago's tradition of bold architecture.Friends of the Parks, which is committed to preserving open space, fought the location out of concern it would open the way for more construction on the valuable ribbon of public, open land along the Lake Michigan shoreline.In a federal lawsuit, it said the city had no authority to hand over the land, citing a legal principle known as the public trust doctrine, which requires the state to ensure open spaces are preserved and accessible to the public.Before Lucas had settled on Chicago, where his wife is from, he had considered locating the museum in San Francisco.The museum, wherever it ends up, will showcase popular art Lucas has collected since college, including illustrations by Norman Rockwell, Maxfield Parrish and N.C. Wyeth, as well as works by Lucas's visual effects company, Industrial Light and Magic.It will also feature digital media arts and film industry art, including props, costumes, set pieces and story boards. Museum officials say the vision is to highlight art that tells a story.

  • Britain's leaving the EU. What should I do with my money?

    As many people around the world are trying to wrap their minds around what just happened in Britain, you may also be wondering "What does the Brexit mean for my money?"If you are worried about your 401(k), take heart. Most experts say you shouldn't rush to sell stocks and some even say it's an opportunity to buy. And, bonus for those looking to borrow: rates may fall.Yes, things are going to be bumpy, but this is a time to stay calm and carry on.STOCKS AND RETIREMENTInvestors with heavy investments in the U.K. and Europe may have felt a sting Friday. U.S. stocks fell more than 3 percent but some European indexes fell over 12 percent.Market experts say the initial market reaction was largely emotional. But they noted that Britain's separation from the EU could take several years to play out and urged investors not to sell out of fear. And some said investors may even want to take advantage of the dip to buy."For the typical U.S. investor this is not really going to change anything," said Jurrien Timmer, director of global macro for Fidelity Investments. "It's not going to affect the U.S. economy, it's not going to tip us into recession."Expecting the worst, Robien Christie of Fort Worth, Texas, checked his 401(k) Friday morning for the first time in months."I was actually surprised," the 25-year old said. "I thought it would be bad but it's still positive for the year."He won't be touching his 401(k), but may put money into the British pound and into buying some stock in British companies as potential long-term investments.Others, meanwhile, said they weren't ready to face the impact."I just don't want to know right now," said Leah Jones of Chicago.The 39-year-old remembers sitting at her desk checking her retirement account when market crashed in 2008. She didn't want to relive that but plans to face it soon: She will call her financial adviser next week for some advice.Understandably, it was a day for worry for many.The VIX, known as the fear index, jumped from 17 to 25 Friday. That is far below the high of 80 it reached in October 2008 in the weeks that followed the collapse of Lehman Brothers."I think that things will work out over the long term. This isn't done in the short term ... the disappointment will roil the markets for a while," said John Manley, chief equity strategist at Wells Fargo Funds.Whether it's the downturn in the stock market or the increase in global uncertainty, these events are a reminder of the need for a thoughtful financial plan, said Mark Hamrick, senior economic analyst for Bankrate.com. That means setting aside adequate savings and having a diversified portfolio.If you don't have a financial adviser, look for information on the right investment choices for you with your retirement plan company."You need to have a plan that makes sense for you and you need to stick to that plan and that includes not freaking out when something like this happens," Timmer said.INTEREST RATESThe Federal Reserve has been slow to raise interest rates due to concerns over global economic instability, and the U.K. vote makes it even less likely the Fed will act soon.That's bad news for savers but great news for borrowers, particularly those looking to get a new mortgage or refinance.Anxious investors seeking the relative safety of U.S. bonds sent prices for the 10-year Treasury note sharply higher. In turn, that pulled the yield on the notes lower Friday. Because long-term mortgage rates tend to track the yield on notes, mortgage rates may fall further."Mortgage rates are tumbling now and they're approaching record-low levels," said Greg McBride, chief financial analyst at Bankrate.com. "If you're a borrower, don't wait to lock your rate as this opportunity may not last long."The average 30-year fixed-rate mortgage edged up this week to 3.56 percent from a 52-week low of 3.54 percent last week. How far rates drop and how long they stay there depends on the extent to which investors remain jittery."If markets bounce back next week, mortgage rates will too," McBride said. "But if the sell-off continues, mortgage rates will continue to fall."The prospect of a drop in mortgage rates has some homebuyers shifting gears.Zack Moore of Beaumont, California, says that, before Friday, he was ready to get prequalified on a home loan right away. But now he's going to hold off so that he can make sure to lock in a lower rate."If I see them drop at all, I may strike, I may try to wait a little while," said Moore, 41.The Brexit could also indirectly benefit other borrowers if the Fed holds off on raising the central bank's key benchmark interest rate. When that rate goes up, it can raise short-term borrowing costs for banks, and that can ultimately lead to higher rates on things such as credit cards, home equity loans and credit lines.

  • British bracing for world economy to punish UK for 'Brexit'

    LONDON (AP) — The British were warned for weeks that a vote to leave the European Union would result in economic pain. Now they'll find out whether it will.U.K. financial leaders are scrambling to reassure households, businesses and investors that they can contain the doom and gloom they had predicted in case of a British exit, or Brexit. The pound plunged to its lowest level in over 30 years on Friday, raising concerns about price inflation, and shares in the U.K.'s biggest banks and real estate builders posted double-digit declines as economists predicted the country would fall into recession.Economists slashed their forecasts for Britain, with some expecting a recession and next to no growth next year. That's a sharp reverse for an economy that had been among the best-performing in the developed world in recent years.In an early sign of problems, Moody's Investors Service downgraded the U.K. outlook from "stable" to "negative." The referendum result, it said, "will herald a prolonged period of uncertainty for the UK, with negative implications for the country's medium-term growth outlook."Holly Miller, 32, said the vote would affect her economic life profoundly."I'm quite shocked by it all," she said. "I'm just applying for a mortgage so we're worried about that."Only the soothing reassurances of Bank of England Governor Mark Carney managed to ease the market carnage on Friday, as he pledged to stabilize markets if needed. But beyond the short-term market turmoil, the concern is what the vote means for the national economy and its 64 million people.Before the vote, with campaigning in full swing, the British Treasury had estimated that an exit from the EU would cost the country the equivalent of 4,300 pounds ($5,900) per household. Tax receipts would face a 30 billion pounds shortfall that would have to be filled with tax increases on income and inheritance. House prices, the Treasury had said, could be as much as 18 percent lower by 2018 than if the country hadn't left the EU.Campaigners for "leave" dismissed this as scare-mongering. With the vote result confirmed, the "remain" camp sought to shift away from warnings and into damage control: trying to maintain confidence in the business community and among households.The City of London Corporation, which represents the financial services industry, a big maker of money and jobs for the country, sought to downplay the impact of the vote on the City, the square mile that is the heart of London's financial hub."The City of London has thrived as a financial and trading center for more than a thousand years and will continue to do so," Mark Boleat, policy chairman for the Corporation, said in a statement. "There will be no mass exit of banks and financial institutions from the square mile. While there will be uncertainty as Brexit negotiations go on we are still the financial center of the fifth-largest economy in the world."Some companies, particularly banks, had said they could move jobs away from London if Britain leaves the EU. That is likely to cost some jobs. How many is yet to be seen.The British economy could also find it more costly to raise money. Ratings agency Standard & Poor's is considering downgrading the country because of the uncertainty related to the vote. A lower rating could mean higher borrowing costs for the government — and in the longer term, less money to spend on schools, hospitals and roads."The real question now is how badly the EU will punish the U.K. for this decision," said Megan Greene, chief economist at Manulife Asset Management.Others were looking on the bright side.At First Property Group, a London-based real estate investment firm, Chief Executive Ben Habib, who backed leaving the EU, said the vote means Britain will now be able to drive a better deal with the rest of Europe.Supporters of the "leave" campaign had accepted that there was a potential economic cost to leaving the EU, but have claimed it is a short-term price to pay in exchange for greater control of policies like immigration and borders."We now have the foundations for a very good negotiation with the EU," he said, while minimizing the market turmoil. "The markets are gyrating, but these are gyrations and will not materially affect our economy."Habib said the pound's drop would help British exporters by making their goods cheaper and more competitive in the global marketplace.Habib's colleague and friend George Digby, however, was less upbeat. He had voted to remain and said the best he could do was wait and see if there is significant economic damage, as his "remain" camp had claimed."I hope I am proved wrong on that score," he said.

  • Arizona court, not federal, to decide VW emissions fraud case

    PHOENIX -- A judge has rebuffed a bid by Volkswagen to have a federal court handle the claim that it violated Arizona consumer protection laws.U.S. District Court Judge Roslyn Silver said the state's entire case is based on the contention that the German automaker knowingly and intentionally deceived Arizonans into buying diesel cars that were supposed to produce less emissions. In fact, she said, the company has admitted the engines burn dirtier than claimed.What all that means, Silver said, is it is legally irrelevant whether VW did or did not violate federal clean air standards, the claim VW is making to have the case handled by her versus some judge in Maricopa County Superior Court.She said the only issue is whether VW lied to Arizonans. And that, she said, does not require a federal court to decide.The ruling represents a significant victory for Attorney General Mark Brnovich who originally filed the case in state court. While it does not mean he ultimately will win the lawsuit which seeks at least $40 million from VW, it provides what might be called a "home field'' advantage to have a state judge determine the extent of Arizona's consumer fraud laws.In her ruling, Silver said VW set out in 2007 to become the world's largest automaker. She said that required the company to "dramatically increase'' its US sales.

Featured columns

  • OPINION: Larsen attack on Rec Centers Board unfair

    Former Director Darris Larsen made some specific allegations that are damaging to the Association, and as President of the Board next fiscal year I feel that we need to clear the air and start out on the right foot.He attacked certain people on the Board. It is imperative to respond to his allegations. It is not fair to attack the whole Board.The Governing Board of Sun City West is responsible to do the best for the community that we can do.We have a fiduciary responsibility to all of the residents of Sun City West. It is unfortunate when Board members come on with set agendas. Not all Board members might agree that their agenda is the best thing for the community.When certain Board members don’t accomplish their self-interests, they feel they are not being effective.Former Director Larsen came on the board with the agenda of wanting to close two of our golf courses and cut off ticket sales of events to non-residents.

  • OPINION: Rec Centers Board President addresses Darris Larsen allegations

    Last Friday, Director Darris Larsen submitted his resignation from the Governing Board of the Sun City West Recreation Centers (Association Board).  It was disappointing that former Director Larsen chose to submit his resignation in such a public way.This will not contribute to the harmony of the community that the Board and staff work so hard to achieve.I'd like to address some allegations of former Director Larsen. But before I do that, I would like to make a couple things clear. We, the Association Board, operate completely open and above board! We do not meet in secret. All our meetings are open to the community and the media. The meetings are publicized so you know what we are talking about at that meeting, even committee meetings. When we agree to volunteer for three years on the Association Board, we do that for the greater good of the community. We should never have an agenda, but unfortunately that is not always true. Former Director Larsen suggests that there is “an atmosphere of self-interest and intimidation” and further that the President and officers “are encouraging this.” Nothing could be further from the truth.Former Director Larsen speaks of “bullying.'' A good Board will have a diverse group of people serving on the Board, both men and women.

  • VENTS: Mitt Romney jealous, Muslims, President forever, Mail voting, Drivers

    “Mitt Romney is jealous of Donald Trump. Trump supported Romney and donated to his campaign. This is some payback. Romney was a spineless candidate who refused to fight during the campaign and refused to bring up Benghazi during the debates. Romney needs to go away.”“There are several states in this country where the textbooks have been strongly influenced by the Muslims. There are a great number of pages about the Muslim religion and about seven paragraphs about Christianity. Children are being forced in some schools to wear burkas, even Christian children. They want the teacher to be fully aware of the Muslim religion, the good points, not the bad points.”“President Obama threatened the British people with dire consequences if they left the European Union. Now his threats imply that he intends to be president forever. Just remember if he did declare martial law, he can make himself president forever.”“Why is Loretta O’Mallley (May 17, Daily News-Sun, A1) or anyone standing in line to vote and complaining about the wait? I have always voted by mail. You receive a booklet with all the issues that are on the ballot to study and decide, complete your ballot and drop it in the mail. No waiting or complaining, folks.”“We live between 107th and 103rd on Cumberland Drive, which is very wide and we have people in cars and golf cars going right down the middle of the street 95 percent of the time. Don’t they know when they were given their driver’s licenses that they are supposed to stay to the right side of the road. Someone is going to get killed and I hope it is not in front of my house.”

Wild Horse West

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New York Today: A Primary Primer

Good morning on this marvelous Monday. It’s primary week, again. On Tuesday, many New Yorkers are choosing nominees for congressional races. P…

Published: June 27, 2016 - 4:33 am @ http://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/27/nyregion/new-yor…

We're Driving A 2016 Mazda CX-9 Signature, Which Is Very Expensive, And Very Good

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Published: June 27, 2016 - 4:18 am @ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2016/06/driving-2…

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Published: June 27, 2016 - 3:32 am @ http://samuel-warde.com/2016/06/explain-donald-tru…

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Published: June 26, 2016 - 11:42 pm @ http://ktar.com/story/1142897/castles-in-coasters-…

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Will consumers buy used vehicles sight unseen from people they don't know? They will if the deal goes through a third party they trust, and if…

Published: June 26, 2016 - 11:12 pm @ http://www.autonews.com/article/20160627/RETAIL04/…

Phoenix Things to do: 11 events to check out this week around the Valley (June 27

PHOENIX - Another hot weekend in Arizona over! If you're planning ahead, its a holiday weekend. Technically, the Fourth of July is a week away…

Published: June 26, 2016 - 11:00 pm @ http://www.abc15.com/entertainment/events/phoenix-…

New wildfire: Racetrack Fire burning northeast of Tucson

TUCSON, AZ - A new wildfire has ignited in the mountains northeast of Tucson. Officials he fire started near Redington Road in the Catalina mo…

Published: June 26, 2016 - 10:02 pm @ http://www.abc15.com/news/region-central-southern-…

WATCH: Are the Arizona Cardinals on the verge of replacing the Dallas Cowboys as America's Team?

"All or Nothing," an eight-part documentary series that details the Arizona Cardinals' 2015 season both on and off the field, will debut on Am…

Published: June 26, 2016 - 10:00 pm @ http://www.abc15.com/sports/sports-blogs-local/wat…

Pope says Church should ask gay community for forgiveness for past treatment

Driving in Canada Canada - a home away from home Canada, it's time to change! Living with a disability in Indo-Canadian society The empire str…

Published: June 26, 2016 - 9:32 pm @ http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/world/europe/Po…

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