Steady Mountain Ridge badminton finishes one of its best regular seasons - Your West Valley News: WestValleyPreps

Steady Mountain Ridge badminton finishes one of its best regular seasons

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Posted: Tuesday, October 18, 2016 2:30 pm

For its six years of existence the Mountain Ridge High School badminton team has found steady success.

Under the guidance of head coach and founder Tim Rosinbum, the fairly young program has posed a winning record since its first year.

“We’ve had a lot of success, beginning from the very first season, even with players that have played for only one year and had never played before,” Rosinbum said. “We were 9-5 that very first year.”

Rosinbum attributes a lot of the success to the program’s first group of players.

“The initial pioneers of the program, the first girls that came through laid a foundation for what success looks like in practice and competitively set some standards for that,” Rosinbum said. “For me that really, really matters.”

Following that first team, the next five Mountain Ridge squads — including this year’s team — reached the Division I playoffs.

The 2016 team may be the best since the Mountain Lions reached the 2013 state semifinals. Mountain Ridge finished the regular season 12-2 overall with a 7-2 victory over rival O’Connor last Thursday.

The Mountain Lions entered that match ranked at the top of its section and No. 5 in its division, while the Eagles ranked second in the section and No. 6 in Division I. The victory clinched a Desert Valley region title for Mountain Ridge.

The playoffs began Monday with matchups yet to be determined.

“There’s never someone who just goes halfway,” senior co-Capt. Mackenzie Whitten said. “We all do everything full out and we make sure we have fun while we do it. It’s more of a laid back sport but it’s still really hard work.”

Rosinbum said that the program has grown from its successful beginnings and has been fortunate to have skilled players.

“We’ve been blessed with a lot of talent, and in particular, girls who want to work really hard and improve and want to get better,” Rosinbum said. “The sport itself attracts a lot of advanced placement and honor students and that actually helps because those girls know what it means to work hard for success.”

Senior co-captain Gaby Nichols said the coach makes the sport really hard work and pushes players, but they still love coming to practice.

“We still work for it because we want to win,” Nichols said. “We’re a good team and we want to keep fulfilling that.”

The Lions’ typical practice day involves plenty of stretching, hitting drills, singles and doubles training, plus conditioning, sprints and jogs. Then they end the practice with a game called Unicorn, which looked like a five-on-five mixture of badminton and dodgeball.

In addition to the everyday practice, the team attends two summer camps before the season starts, one in June and one in August.

“So what happens is (coach will) have the returning players introduce ourselves to the new players because, one, they’re freshman, and two, it’s a completely new sport and you know no one, so we know how scary it can be,” Whitten said. “And then he teaches them how to swing the racket. It’s pretty basic stuff.”

Through hard work, the badminton program has regularly qualified for the state tournament and has posted records go from 9-5 to 12-2 and even reaching 14-0 one year.

This year’s only losses were a 5-4 squeaker to No. 4 Phoenix Desert Vista and an 8-1 defeat at the hands of No. 2 Gilbert Perry. Other than those losses, only No. 7 Mountain View has taken three points off the Mountain Lions.

“I like to give a lot of credit to the girls themselves, of course a coach matters, but only so much as the players want to improve and get better themselves and really the credit for our success goes to them,” Rosinbum said.

Editor’s Note: Alyanna Kathrine Harina is a sophomore at Arizona State University and a reporter with the Cronkite School.

For its six years of existence the Mountain Ridge High School badminton team has found steady success.

Under the guidance of head coach and founder Tim Rosinbum, the fairly young program has posed a winning record since its first year.

“We’ve had a lot of success, beginning from the very first season, even with players that have played for only one year and had never played before,” Rosinbum said. “We were 9-5 that very first year.”

Rosinbum attributes a lot of the success to the program’s first group of players.

“The initial pioneers of the program, the first girls that came through laid a foundation for what success looks like in practice and competitively set some standards for that,” Rosinbum said. “For me that really, really matters.”

Following that first team, the next five Mountain Ridge squads — including this year’s team — reached the Division I playoffs.

The 2016 team may be the best since the Mountain Lions reached the 2013 state semifinals. Mountain Ridge finished the regular season 12-2 overall with a 7-2 victory over rival O’Connor last Thursday.

The Mountain Lions entered that match ranked at the top of its section and No. 5 in its division, while the Eagles ranked second in the section and No. 6 in Division I. The victory clinched a Desert Valley region title for Mountain Ridge.

The playoffs began Monday with matchups yet to be determined.

“There’s never someone who just goes halfway,” senior co-Capt. Mackenzie Whitten said. “We all do everything full out and we make sure we have fun while we do it. It’s more of a laid back sport but it’s still really hard work.”

Rosinbum said that the program has grown from its successful beginnings and has been fortunate to have skilled players.

“We’ve been blessed with a lot of talent, and in particular, girls who want to work really hard and improve and want to get better,” Rosinbum said. “The sport itself attracts a lot of advanced placement and honor students and that actually helps because those girls know what it means to work hard for success.”

Senior co-captain Gaby Nichols said the coach makes the sport really hard work and pushes players, but they still love coming to practice.

“We still work for it because we want to win,” Nichols said. “We’re a good team and we want to keep fulfilling that.”

The Lions’ typical practice day involves plenty of stretching, hitting drills, singles and doubles training, plus conditioning, sprints and jogs. Then they end the practice with a game called Unicorn, which looked like a five-on-five mixture of badminton and dodgeball.

In addition to the everyday practice, the team attends two summer camps before the season starts, one in June and one in August.

“So what happens is (coach will) have the returning players introduce ourselves to the new players because, one, they’re freshman, and two, it’s a completely new sport and you know no one, so we know how scary it can be,” Whitten said. “And then he teaches them how to swing the racket. It’s pretty basic stuff.”

Through hard work, the badminton program has regularly qualified for the state tournament and has posted records go from 9-5 to 12-2 and even reaching 14-0 one year.

This year’s only losses were a 5-4 squeaker to No. 4 Phoenix Desert Vista and an 8-1 defeat at the hands of No. 2 Gilbert Perry. Other than those losses, only No. 7 Mountain View has taken three points off the Mountain Lions.

“I like to give a lot of credit to the girls themselves, of course a coach matters, but only so much as the players want to improve and get better themselves and really the credit for our success goes to them,” Rosinbum said.

Editor’s Note: Alyanna Kathrine Harina is a sophomore at Arizona State University and a reporter with the Cronkite School.

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