Your West Valley News: Sports

Sports

  • Native Americans demonstrate, urging Redskins name change

    GLENDALE, Ariz. -- More than 100 protesters chanted and carried signs Sunday outside University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale calling for the Washington Redskins to change their team name.“We are people. Not mascots! Change the name,” chanted the protesters, adding: “Game over for racism.”Washington Redskins owner Daniel Snyder has stood his ground amid calls for the name change, saying he does not see it as derogatory, but rather that it honors Native Americans.Inside the stadium, during the game between Washington and the Arizona Cardinals, some fans held signs that read: “Keep the name.”Also inside the stadium, Navajo Nation President Ben Shelly, wearing a Redskins cap, was seated next to Snyder.The president’s spokesman, Deswood Tome, said Shelly was there to discuss an NFL franchising agreement involving Navajo artists.

  • Breast cancer survivors participate in Cardinals' halftime show Sunday

    Breast cancer survivors and Cigna employees will be participating in this Sunday’s halftime show at the Arizona Cardinals game.The Arizona Cardinals are using this game to create breast health awareness.The survivors will be performing a surprise routine with the Arizona Cardinals cheerleaders. The kickoff will be at 1:25 p.m. when the Arizona Cardinals will face the Washington Redskins. The event will be at University of Phoenix Stadium at 1 Cardinals Drive, Glendale.Krista Sullivan, a breast cancer survivor and resident of Glendale, will participate in the halftime show. Sullivan was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2006 and underwent a mastectomy and reconstructive surgery.After going through treatment she found out that she also was at a higher risk for developing ovarian cancer because of a gene mutation called BRCA1. She then had to have a hysterectomy. Due to the invasive surgery, she was never able to have a child of her own.

  • That’s hall, folks, for 2 bowlers

    The Bowling Association of Sun City West will induct two new members into its hall of fame during a banquet on Oct. 18.Terry Hamman will be honored for bowling proficiency while Sheryl Sutherland will be honored for meritorious service to the club and its members.Hamman is originally from Illinois and spent his information technology career primarily in Janesville, Wis., ending in the Seattle area.He has rolled six perfect games, including two in R.H. Johnson Lanes in Sun City West. Hamman is a member of the Janesville Bowling Hall of Fame in Wisconsin and has participated in the ABC-USBC national tournament for 40 consecutive years.Hamman retired to Sun City West in 2007 and his league average is over 200.Hamman and his wife of 44 years, Marian, have three children and three grandchildren. They have immersed themselves in community activities, including the Bowling Association. Besides his involvement as club president and No Tap Committee chairman, he found time to volunteer as Sun City West governing board director, serving one year as president.

National Sports

  • College player fights tumor for moment on court

    CINCINNATI (AP) — Lauren Hill is the last player to take the court for the 6 a.m. stretch before basketball practice. She's moving slowly today. The freshman wearing the blue No. 22 Mount St. Joseph jersey has days like this lately. Days when the inoperable tumor squeezing her brain also saps her energy and robs her of coordination. Days when it would be easy just to stay in bed. Not a chance. Since her diagnosis a year ago, she makes sure no opportunity gets wasted. "That's kind of how I look at it," Hill said during an interview, resting in a folding chair after practice Thursday. "I'm spreading awareness and also teaching people how to live in the moment because the next moment's not promised. Anything can happen at any given moment. What matters is right now." Acknowledging the urgency, the NCAA made a special exception to move up the Division III school's opener against Hiram College to Nov. 2, despite its rules that require seasons to start later in November. The scheduling change gives Hill a better shot to get on the court — the only chance she may get before the growing tumor that hinders her play also claims her life. After the move, Xavier University offered its 10,000-seat arena so more people could attend. The game sold out faster than a Cleveland Cavaliers exhibition earlier this month. College basketball players and sports teams from around the country are signing No. 22 jerseys and sending them to Lauren for support. The United States Basketball Writers Association has voted her for the Pat Summitt most courageous award, which is usually given out at the Final Four. "This is an amazing young lady who's made an impact on the world, more than I will ever do," said coach Dan Benjamin, wearing a gray "Play for 22" T-shirt. "I wish everybody could meet her." Hill played basketball and soccer in nearby Lawrenceburg, Indiana. On her 18th birthday last October, she decided to commit to play basketball at The Mount, as it's known locally. A few weeks later, she started feeling bad. Tests found the cancerous tumor growing throughout her brain. Surgery wasn't an option. Six weeks of radiation, an experimental drug and two months of chemotherapy didn't help much. Doctors estimated she had a year to live. "I try not to — try really hard not to — but it's hard to not think about down the road," she said. While she prepares to play, she does as much as she can each day to raise awareness about pediatric cancer, hoping donations might fund research that gives others a chance of beating the disease. A lot of people are going out of their way to get to know the ponytailed, 5-foot-10 player who is showing everyone — with each deliberate dribble, every left-handed shot, each time she just shows up — what it means to live each day fully. NCAA President Mark Emmert called to offer encouragement. The school's president, Tony Aretz, stopped by with his wife to watch her practice and chat with Hill and her mom. And to watch No. 22 push herself as far as she can on the court. "She's living with courage when a lot of people are afraid to live," Aretz said. Cincinnati Bengals defensive lineman Devon Still stopped in unexpectedly this week. Still's 4-year-old daughter, Leah, has cancer, and he has worked with the NFL team to raise more than $1 million for pediatric cancer treatment. "It's like she's beyond her years," Still said. "She understands her purpose. In her 19 years of being here on Earth, she's done a lot more than a lot of older people have done." Hill's parents and two younger siblings are trying to pack as much as they can into however many weeks she has left. "You try not to concentrate on it too much because you can get caught up in the grief of the sheer fact that you're probably going to lose your child," her mother, Lisa Hill said. "But if I grieve and get depressed and curl up into a ball, I rob myself and her of today. Why? "We've got today. I can spend today with her doing everything we want to do — just chit-chatting, listening to music, going shopping, whatever she wants to do. If I didn't get out of bed, I'd miss out on all those things." Although she's right-handed, Lauren has to shoot with her left because the tumor is affecting her right side more severely. She gets dizzy if she moves her head side-to-side, so she has to move her upper body instead. Her balance is a little off. She'll be able to play only a few minutes at a time on Nov. 2. Even with all of that, she refuses to think of it as her one and only game. "She says, 'I hate that. If I can play one more game, I'm playing one more game,'" Lisa Hill said. "If she's upright and able, she'll still be out there." Online: https://thecurestartsnow.webconnex.com/lauren

  • Pennsylvania town can keep Jim Thorpe's body

    Jim Thorpe's body will stay in the Pennsylvania town where he was laid to rest six decades ago after a federal appeals court Thursday threw out a ruling that could have resulted in his reburial on American Indian land in Oklahoma. The famed athlete's surviving sons have been fighting to move the body to Sac and Fox land in the state where he was born, saying their father expressed a desire to be buried in Oklahoma. A federal judge agreed with them, ruling the town of Jim Thorpe amounted to a museum under a 1990 law intended to rectify the historic plundering of American Indian burial grounds. But the Philadelphia-based 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said Thursday that Thorpe's body should remain in Jim Thorpe, determining that U.S. District Judge Richard Caputo misapplied the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act. The law requires museums and federal agencies possessing American Indian remains to return them upon request of the deceased's family or tribe. "Thorpe's remains are located in their final resting place and have not been disturbed," the appeals court said in its ruling. "We find that applying (the repatriation law) to Thorpe's burial in the borough is such a clearly absurd result and so contrary to Congress's intent to protect Native American burial sites that the borough cannot be held to the requirements imposed on a museum under these circumstances." Thorpe's son, Bill Thorpe, 86, of Fort Worth, Texas, said he's disappointed by the court's ruling and will consider an appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court. "We wanted him where he wanted to be, but it doesn't sound like it's going to happen," he said. Thorpe was a football, baseball and track star who won the decathlon and pentathlon in the 1912 Olympics. He died without a will in 1953 at age 64. After Oklahoma's governor balked at the cost of a planned monument to the athlete, third wife Patricia had Thorpe's body removed during his funeral service and sent it to northeastern Pennsylvania. She struck a deal with two merging towns — Mauch Chunk and East Mauch Chunk — to build a memorial and name the new town after him. His remains are kept in a roadside mausoleum surrounded by statues and interpretive signage. The borough on the western edge of Pennsylvania's Pocono Mountains is popular with tourists and frequently appears on lists of America's prettiest towns, but few come specifically to visit Thorpe's memorial, and the town's economy is not dependent on its connection to the man. Nevertheless, Jim Thorpe throws a Jim Thorpe birthday bash every year, celebrating his legacy as one of the 20th century's greatest athletes, and the high school's athletic teams are named the Olympians. Anne Marie Fitzpatrick, a shop owner who organizes the annual Thorpe celebration, said she's "been on a high all day" after learning the mausoleum would stay. "He can rest in peace," she said. "That was the most important thing: leave him alone." Though he lost his bid to get the grave moved, Bill Thorpe didn't appear to hold a grudge against the town. "It's been a good place, he said. "They've taken good care of him and continued the name."

  • Royals clobber Giants 7-2 to even World Series

    KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — Salvador Perez shouted at Hunter Strickland, who shouted right back. The Kansas City Royals streamed from their dugout, the San Francisco Giants from their own. And for a tense moment in the sixth inning Wednesday night, Kauffman Stadium was consumed by chaos. The one thing that was clear? The World Series suddenly had some life. Perez broke open Game 2 with a two-run double in a five-run sixth, and the Royals' cast of clutch relievers kept the Giants in check for a 7-2 victory that evened the Series and spiced things up as it shifts to San Francisco for three games. "We showed them that we have fight in us, and I think they knew that already," said Billy Butler, whose RBI single in the sixth inning gave the Royals a 3-2 lead. "But we stepped up big there as a team, and that gave us some confidence." Jeremy Guthrie will be on the mound Friday night for the Royals, who had won eight straight playoff games before a 7-1 loss in the opener. Tim Hudson will start for San Francisco. "With their pitching and our pitching, and the way both teams play, we're going to have a fight, I think, every game," Giants manager Bruce Bochy said. So much talk of fighting after the two teams nearly came to blows Wednesday. The Royals had surged ahead on Butler's single when Perez followed with a double off Strickland into the left-field gap. Omar Infante then scorched a pitch into the bullpen in left, the fifth homer that Strickland had allowed to 23 postseason batters. Boiling over with anger, Strickland yelled into his glove then got into a shouting match with Perez as the big, burly catcher headed for home. Players spilled out of both dugouts, and several Royals streamed in from the outfield bullpen before the umpires finally restored order. "He started to look at me, so I asked him like, 'Hey, why you look at me?'" Perez said. "So he was telling me, 'Get out of here, whatever.' So I don't know. 'You don't have to treat me like that. Look at Omar. Omar hit a bomb. I didn't hit a bomb. I hit a double.'" Strickland said he simply let his frustration get to him. "I let the team down," he said. "My emotions got to me." With his 100 mph fastball singeing the Giants' batters, Royals flamethrower Yordano Ventura allowed two runs while pitching into the sixth inning. The 23-year-old protege of Pedro Martinez hardly looked like the first rookie to make a World Series start for the Royals, calmly handling a lineup that had ravaged staff ace James Shields. The dynamic trio of Kelvin Herrera, Wade Davis and Greg Holland did the rest. Herrera got the final two outs of the sixth to escape a jam, his first three pitches clocking at least 100 mph. He also survived a shaky seventh before Davis breezed through the eighth. Greg Holland, who saved each game in the Royals' sweep of Baltimore in the AL Championship Series, allowed a two-out single to Brandon Crawford before fanning Gregor Blanco to end the game. The Giants' only runs came on a homer by Blanco and a double by Brandon Belt, their streak of seven straight World Series wins ending on a crisp, breezy night. "For us to leave here with a split, you like to get greedy," Bochy said, "but we know it's going to be a tough series." Early on, it looked as if the Giants could have a big lead heading back to the Bay Area. The fleet-footed Blanco silenced a rollicking sea of blue, becoming the 10th player to open a World Series game with a home run. He deposited Ventura's 98 mph fastball in the bullpen in right field, just his 17th home run in more than 2,300 at-bats. The crowd, energized from the moment that Hall of Famer George Brett delivered the ceremonial first pitch, was left waiting for something good to happen for the second straight night. This time, the scrappy Royals gave it to them. ALCS MVP Lorenzo Cain stretched a two-out double later in the first, and Eric Hosmer walked on four pitches. Butler, Giants starter Jake Peavy's long-time nemesis, then bounced a single past the outstretched glove of Crawford at shortstop to knot the game 1-all. The Royals kept the pressure on in second. Infante doubled over the head of Travis Ishikawa in left field, and Escobar sliced a two-out double down the right-field line to give Kansas City a 2-1 lead, its first in the World Series since Game 7 in 1985. The Giants, so accustomed to October baseball, refused to back down. Belt tied it in the fourth with a double that bounced off Nori Aoki's glove in right field. The game was still knotted at 2 when the Royals got their first two batters aboard in the sixth. Bochy pulled the fiery Peavy. Butler promptly hit a go-ahead single off Jean Machi, and Strickland came in two batters later. From there, well, the Royals showed they still had plenty of fight left. PLENTY OF PITCHERS The Giants matched a Series record by using five pitchers in one inning. The other teams to burn through as many pitchers did so in Game 7 losses: The Cardinals against the Royals in '85, and the Orioles against the Pirates in 1979, according to STATS. UP NEXT Giants: Hudson has appeared in 12 postseason games and started 11 of them, first with Oakland and then Atlanta. But he's never been on the mound in the World Series. Royals: Guthrie, an 11-year veteran, did not pitch in the Royals' sweep of the Angels in the ALDS. He made his first career postseason start in the ALCS against the Orioles.

  • Manage blood pressure with regular exercise

    Sun Health will offer a free class on ways to manage high blood pressure through exercise.The session will be from 2 to 3 p.m. Monday in the Community Room at the Sun Health Center for Health & Wellbeing, 14719 W. Grand Ave., Surprise.This informational non-exercise class will provide methods to manage high blood pressure, including regular physical activity.Rhonda Zonoozi, exercise physiologist and health coach, will offer recommendations for safe exercise when you have high blood pressure.To register, call 623-455-5633.For information, visit www.sunhealth.org and click “Community Education” at the top of the page.

  • Culver’s of Surprise wins competition

    Culver’s of Surprise is a regional champion in the nationwide Culver’s Crew Challenge contest, where Culver’s restaurants compete in the areas of quality, service, cleanliness, hospitality and community outreach.Culver’s of Surprise is one of 48 restaurants out of nearly 500 to advance.“It’s great to reach regional champion status in the competition,” said Rob Bullock, operator of Culver’s of Surprise.“Our team members are committed to delivering the very best to our guests and this simply validates what we try to do every day.”The evaluation of restaurants and team members comes from the Culver’s support team, utilizing elements of our guest feedback program as well as input from secret shoppers.The competition includes prize money with $50,000 going to the first-place restaurant. The three runner-up restaurants will receive $10,000 each.

  • 850-plus gather for presentation ripping EPCOR Water’s proposal

    An overflow crowd turned out Thursday night in Sun City West for a presentation on the effects that a consolidated wastewater district will have on the pocketbooks of those living in the retirement community and beyond.Bill Hansen, president of PORA, delivered a presentation to 850 people on EPCOR Water’s proposed wastewater consolidation plans, which he said discriminates against retirement communities such as Sun City West and Sun City.Outside the Palm Ridge Recreation Center, SCW Unite! was gathering signatures in opposition to consolidation. Cindy Knowlton, recreation manager for the Recreation Centers of Sun City West, said 50 people were turned away from entering the Summit room because there wasn’t any more space.Hansen said the impact of wastewater consolidation for Sun City and Sun City West would have property owners shouldering 100 percent of the costs so that everyone else in the district could get a reduction in residential rates.The Sun Cities will pay for projects outside of their communities, he added. “Every single one of the five districts, now has announced capital improvement projects,” ranging up to $10 million, he said. “That’s phase two of your rate going up.”Under the current system, Hansen said each community is responsible for its own capital improvements. He broke down the costs to the Sun Cities if they covered their own capital improvements, compared to paying for the other districts under consolidation.

  • Foothills Library stocks up for book sale

    The semiannual Fabulous Fall Book Sale at Foothills Library, 19055 N. 57th Ave., is from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday in the Roadrunner and Hummingbird rooms.There will be something for everyone in the Roadrunner Room, with prices starting at 50 cents. Westerns, mysteries, romance, general fiction and non-fiction ranging in subjects from arts and entertainment to textbooks and travel will be available for all reading tastes.In addition to books for adults, teens and children, there will be DVDs and audiobooks for sale. These items generally sell quickly, so come early for the best selections.Additionally, a “Buck-a-Bag” sale will be all day in the Hummingbird Room. The library will provide bags which you can fill with books for just $1 per bag. Only cash will be accepted in the “Buck-a-Bag” room.Although the book sale begins at 10 a.m., note that the library itself does not open until noon.All proceeds from the sale will benefit the library. For information about the sale, call Janet at 623-930-3854. For information, visit www.glendaleaz.com/library.

  • West Valley event touches truck lovers

    A cacophony of horns blared through the east parking lot of Westgate Entertinment District in Glendale Saturday, as children — and maybe a few adults — lined up to give an assortment of big rigs a honk.The Touch-a-Truck collaboration between Empire Cat and Glendale Parks, Recreation and Neighborhood Services was again a hit with the younger set.Between Empire Cat, official city vehicles, and big trucks from fellow presenting sponsors Arizona Trucking Association, Bedrock Sand and Gravel, CEMEX and American Institute of Trucking, every type of work, emergency service or mass transit truck was covered. And the array attracted visitors from across the Valley.“I liked the crane. Everybody was a little scared of the horn,” said Adriana Montes, 8, of Phoenix.Live demonstrations of some of the equipment added to the fun. A concrete pumper and crane smack in the middle of the parking lot towered over the proceedings.“She’s my little tomboy. She loves tractors, she loves playing in the dirt and being out and about,” Marla Montes said. “Anything to have her be outside, instead of having her be on the phone or computer all day. This is much better.”

  • 850-plus gather for presentation ripping EPCOR Water’s proposal

    An overflow crowd turned out Thursday night in Sun City West for a presentation on the effects that a consolidated wastewater district will have on the pocketbooks of those living in the retirement community and beyond.Bill Hansen, president of PORA, delivered a presentation to 850 people on EPCOR Water’s proposed wastewater consolidation plans, which he said discriminates against retirement communities such as Sun City West and Sun City.Outside the Palm Ridge Recreation Center, SCW Unite! was gathering signatures in opposition to consolidation. Cindy Knowlton, recreation manager for the Recreation Centers of Sun City West, said 50 people were turned away from entering the Summit room because there wasn’t any more space.Hansen said the impact of wastewater consolidation for Sun City and Sun City West would have property owners shouldering 100 percent of the costs so that everyone else in the district could get a reduction in residential rates.The Sun Cities will pay for projects outside of their communities, he added. “Every single one of the five districts, now has announced capital improvement projects,” ranging up to $10 million, he said. “That’s phase two of your rate going up.”Under the current system, Hansen said each community is responsible for its own capital improvements. He broke down the costs to the Sun Cities if they covered their own capital improvements, compared to paying for the other districts under consolidation.

  • City collects household hazardous waste

    The city of Peoria sponsors various collection days throughout the year in an effort to divert all residential household and hazardous waste from area landfills.The next household and hazardous waste drop-off event will take place Nov. 1 at Liberty High School, 9621 W. Speckled Gecko. For a list of acceptable items, visit www.peoriaaz.gov/hhw.For additional information, call the Solid Waste Division at 623-773-7160.

  • Halloween event hampers traffic near Peoria City Hall

    The city of Peoria is hosting its traditional Halloween event at a new site this year, which will force road closures and other traffic modifications near the Peoria City Hall campus.The annual Peoria Halloween Monster Bash is from 5 to 9 p.m. Saturday at Centennial Plaza, behind City Hall, 8401 W. Monroe St. Road closures and traffic modifications along Monroe Street from 83rd to 85th avenues will take place starting this evening through early Sunday morning.  No vehicle access in or out of residences will be allowed during the closure. No-parking signs will be placed on the closed sections starting today to attempt to clear the streets for the event.

  • Peoria school promotes exercise

    Frontier Elementary School in Peoria will host a free Harvest Fest/Fuel Up to Play 60 Kick-Off event from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday.The event will include health screenings, fun fitness and football activities along with a variety of harvest events, including a pumpkin patch, crafts, a fanatic football fan contest and a vendor fair.This event is designed to educate individuals on the Fuel Up to Play 60 Program, which is something the Peoria Unified School District encourages on its 42 elementary and high school campuses.Fuel Up to Play 60 works to combat childhood obesity by helping schools make positive changes which encourage healthy eating and daily physical activity.The program is sponsored by the National Dairy Council and the NFL and provides resources and opportunities for students and schools to learn about healthy life habits, to develop leadership skills and to earn fun incentives.Frontier Elementary School is at 21258 N. 81st Ave.

  • 850-plus gather for presentation ripping EPCOR Water’s proposal

    An overflow crowd turned out Thursday night in Sun City West for a presentation on the effects that a consolidated wastewater district will have on the pocketbooks of those living in the retirement community and beyond.Bill Hansen, president of PORA, delivered a presentation to 850 people on EPCOR Water’s proposed wastewater consolidation plans, which he said discriminates against retirement communities such as Sun City West and Sun City.Outside the Palm Ridge Recreation Center, SCW Unite! was gathering signatures in opposition to consolidation. Cindy Knowlton, recreation manager for the Recreation Centers of Sun City West, said 50 people were turned away from entering the Summit room because there wasn’t any more space.Hansen said the impact of wastewater consolidation for Sun City and Sun City West would have property owners shouldering 100 percent of the costs so that everyone else in the district could get a reduction in residential rates.The Sun Cities will pay for projects outside of their communities, he added. “Every single one of the five districts, now has announced capital improvement projects,” ranging up to $10 million, he said. “That’s phase two of your rate going up.”Under the current system, Hansen said each community is responsible for its own capital improvements. He broke down the costs to the Sun Cities if they covered their own capital improvements, compared to paying for the other districts under consolidation.

  • EPCOR goes to video in bid to curtail cost of upgrading Sun City infrastructure

    SUN CITY, Ariz. -- Behind EPCOR’s push to consolidate its wastewater treatment districts is the private utility’s desire to spread the costs of maintaining its network of pipes, plants and other equipment as well as meeting future expansion.Perhaps nowhere is the need for a reliable funding source for these projects more acute right now than in Sun City.“The Sun City system is the oldest set of pipes,” noted EPCOR spokeswoman Rebecca Stenholm.Exactly how much work will be required won’t be known until the utility completes a districtwide evaluation of miles of sewer lines, most of which are over 50 years old.ECPOR personnel are scheduled to launch a study within weeks that will produce a 5-year infrastructure improvement schedule in the Sun City district, Stenholm said during a visit to a site along Lake Forest Drive, where a crew Thursday performed underground sewer-line inspections and maintenance work.While not funded directly by wastewater service rate revenues, these tasks are considered by the utility essential to reducing the financial burden for new infrastructure, Stenholm noted.

  • RCSC general manager views battle with breast cancer as ‘blessing’

    Jan Ek has many roles in Sun City.She’s the general manager for the multi-million dollar Recreation Centers of Sun City, a wife, mother and grandmother.She’s also a cancer survivor.In 2006 Ek’s life changed one day before she and her husband moved into their new home in Sun City. She was diagnosed with an aggressive form of breast cancer.“The doctor told me, and I just stayed quiet. He asked me what I was thinking and I said I think this is a blessing. He called me the next few days to make sure I was OK. He was waiting for me to explode I think. I didn’t. I just knew it would bless my life. I didn’t know how yet, but I had faith,” Ek said.Ek had a double mastectomy and underwent chemotherapy.

  • 850-plus gather for presentation ripping EPCOR Water’s proposal

    An overflow crowd turned out Thursday night in Sun City West for a presentation on the effects that a consolidated wastewater district will have on the pocketbooks of those living in the retirement community and beyond.Bill Hansen, president of PORA, delivered a presentation to 850 people on EPCOR Water’s proposed wastewater consolidation plans, which he said discriminates against retirement communities such as Sun City West and Sun City.Outside the Palm Ridge Recreation Center, SCW Unite! was gathering signatures in opposition to consolidation. Cindy Knowlton, recreation manager for the Recreation Centers of Sun City West, said 50 people were turned away from entering the Summit room because there wasn’t any more space.Hansen said the impact of wastewater consolidation for Sun City and Sun City West would have property owners shouldering 100 percent of the costs so that everyone else in the district could get a reduction in residential rates.The Sun Cities will pay for projects outside of their communities, he added. “Every single one of the five districts, now has announced capital improvement projects,” ranging up to $10 million, he said. “That’s phase two of your rate going up.”Under the current system, Hansen said each community is responsible for its own capital improvements. He broke down the costs to the Sun Cities if they covered their own capital improvements, compared to paying for the other districts under consolidation.

  • EPCOR goes to video in bid to curtail cost of upgrading Sun City infrastructure

    SUN CITY, Ariz. -- Behind EPCOR’s push to consolidate its wastewater treatment districts is the private utility’s desire to spread the costs of maintaining its network of pipes, plants and other equipment as well as meeting future expansion.Perhaps nowhere is the need for a reliable funding source for these projects more acute right now than in Sun City.“The Sun City system is the oldest set of pipes,” noted EPCOR spokeswoman Rebecca Stenholm.Exactly how much work will be required won’t be known until the utility completes a districtwide evaluation of miles of sewer lines, most of which are over 50 years old.ECPOR personnel are scheduled to launch a study within weeks that will produce a 5-year infrastructure improvement schedule in the Sun City district, Stenholm said during a visit to a site along Lake Forest Drive, where a crew Thursday performed underground sewer-line inspections and maintenance work.While not funded directly by wastewater service rate revenues, these tasks are considered by the utility essential to reducing the financial burden for new infrastructure, Stenholm noted.

  • Artist demonstrates watercolor techniques

    Malcolm Blazer, guest artist, demonstrated water color techniques at the Sun West Art Club’s general meeting on Oct. 13.He also discussed varius watercolor papers and paints and explained how they can influence a painting.Blazer is an accomplished professional with expertise in several styles of watercolor and also works in oils and pastels. He teaches at Glendale Community College and is one of the artists offering classes for the Sun West Art Club.Interested in trying your hand at art?The Sun West Art Club provides the opportunity to explore different media to learn new techniques or to expand artistic skills.Classes and workshops are taught by professional artists who offer instruction in watercolor, oils, drawing, pastels and mixed media.

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From West Valley Preps

Wednesday 10/22/2014
Mountain Ridge vs. Pinnacle Volleyball
Posted: October 22, 2014

Mountain Ridge defeats Pinnacle 3-0 on Tuesday, October 21, 2014. Photos by Jarod Opperman/West Valley Preps

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Wednesday 09/24/2014
Valley Vista vs. Sunrise Mountain Volleyball
Updated: September 25, 2014 - 10:22 am

Sunrise Mountain defeats Valley Vista 3-0 on Tuesday, September 23, 2014. Photos by Jarod Opperman/West Valley Preps

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Tuesday 09/23/2014
Deer Valley vs. Willow Canyon Football
Updated: September 25, 2014 - 10:08 am

Deer Valley defeats Willow Canyon 26-7 on Friday, September 19, 2014. Photos by Jarod Opperman/West Valley Preps

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Friday 09/12/2014
Centennial vs. Brophy Football
Updated: September 13, 2014 - 2:10 am

Centennial defeats Brophy 24-14 on Thursday, September 11, 2014. Photos by Jarod Opperman/West Valley Preps

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