Your West Valley News: Theater


  • Artist mows giant Trump portrait in Italian cornfield

    MILAN (AP) — An Italian land artist has used his tractor to transform a field near the Italian city of Verona into a giant portrait of U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump.Artist Dario Gambarin created a similar portrait of Democrat Hillary Clinton in September.Gambarin created the Trump portrait on a 25,000-square-meter field, writing "Ciao," beneath Trump's left shoulder, signifying recent polls that show Clinton ahead. Still, Gambarin was quoted by the Verona daily L'Arena as saying "anything can happen. And in case of defeat, the Republican Trump can in any case console himself with my huge portrait."Gambarin often chooses topical figures for his tractor art, which he creates freestyle in his cornfield without a pattern. Previous subjects have included Nelson Mandela, Barack Obama and Pope Francis.

  • Justin Timberlake's ballot selfie highlights mixed laws

    Now even Justin Timberlake has been forced to deal with the question of whether a ballot selfie is legal.Timberlake flew from California to Tennessee to vote early this week, but his posting of an image of himself at the voting booth on Instagram on Monday drew questions about whether he was breaking the law.A Tennessee law that took effect earlier this year bars voters from taking photographs or video while they're inside a polling location.While secrecy in the voting booth has become a thing of the past for those ready to share their views and daily lives on social media, laws nationwide are mixed on whether voters are allowed to take pictures of themselves voting and their ballots.Federal courts have struck down bans in New Hampshire and Indiana, and on Monday, a judge in Michigan blocked enforcement of a ban on ballot selfies, saying it violates free speech.Tennessee Secretary of State spokesman Adam Ghassemi said officials are "thrilled Justin can't stop the feeling" but reminded voters to use their phones inside polling locations only to help them vote.

  • 1960s pop singer Bobby Vee has died at age 73

    MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Pop idol Bobby Vee, the boyish, grinning 1960s singer whose career was born when he took a Midwestern stage as a teenager to fill in after the 1959 plane crash that killed rock 'n' roll stars Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and J.P. "The Big Bopper" Richardson, has died. He was 73.Vee, whose hits included the chart-topping "Take Good Care of My Baby" and who helped a young Bob Dylan get his start, died Monday of advanced Alzheimer's disease, said his son, Jeff Velline. Vee was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease in 2011, and performed his last show that year.Vee had been in memory care at The Wellstead of Rogers & Diamondcrest in Rogers, about 25 miles northwest of Minneapolis, for the past 13 months and in hospice care in recent weeks, his son said.Vee died peacefully surrounded by family, Velline said, calling it "the end of a long hard road."He said his father was "a person who brought joy all over the world. That was his job."Born Robert Velline in Fargo, North Dakota, Vee was only 15 when he took the stage in Moorhead, Minnesota, after the Feb. 3, 1959, plane crash in Iowa that killed Holly, Valens and Richardson on their way to the concert. That dark day in rock history was commemorated by singer-songwriter Don McLean in his 1972 pop song "American Pie" as "The Day The Music Died."

Black American journey finally enshrined in national museum

When the Smithsonian Museum of African-American History and Culture opens this week alongside the Washington Monument and the National Museum of American History, it will firmly — and finally — anchor the black experience in the nation's narrative.

  • icon Posted: September 25

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