Craig Wismer elected Arrowhead Justice of the Peace - Your West Valley News: Elections

Craig Wismer elected Arrowhead Justice of the Peace

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Posted: Wednesday, November 28, 2012 9:15 am

Arrowhead Justice of Peace

Tony Behrens                   320

Debra Boehlke                  2,395

Jana Gunn                        1,387

David C. Hickman             1,377

Francisco Meneses            65

Patrick H. Montgomery      18

George L. Mothershed       61

Craig Wismer                   4,860

Richard A. Young              271

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  • Monday seminar extols virtues of yoga

    Sun Health will begin 10 sessions of yoga beginning Monday from 2 to 3 p.m. in the Community Room at the Sun Health Center for Health & Wellbeing, 14719 W. Grand Ave.Yoga has been practiced for more than 5,000 years and offers many health benefits such as increasing flexibility, strength, and balance.It also includes breathing techniques to increase relaxation and help with stress management.The class fee is $5 per session. Ten-session punch cards are available for $40.The class cannot accommodate walk-ins.To register, call 623-455-5633 or visit www.sunhealth.org and click “Community Education” at the top of the page. The Sun Health Community Education Series presents free ongoing health and wellness programs.

  • Sleep is nothing to snore about

    Sun Health will host a seminar on the importance of sleep from 10 to 11 a.m. Tuesday  in the Community Room at the Sun Health Center for Health & Wellbeing, 14719 W. Grand Ave.This class discusses the importance of sleep, how it impacts health and proper sleep hygiene.Instructor will be Deborah Burns, a registered nurse.To register, call 623-455-5633 or visit www.sunhealth.org and click “Community Education” at the top of the page.The Sun Health Community Education Series presents free ongoing health and wellness programs on a variety of health care, healthy living and personal and financial safety topics focused on seniors. Events occur several times each month at locations across the Northwest Valley and are presented as a community service.Events with fewer than 10 reservations are subject to cancellation. We make every effort to avoid cancellations, but if one does occur, we will contact all registered attendees in advance.

  • Solar firms power Surprise business development

    • Part of a series on the environmentAt the beginning of this decade, a pair of Spanish solar power companies decided to build plants in the southeast corner of Surprise.In the years since, Gestamp Solar Steel and Rioglass Solar have been an energy source for job creation and recruiting businesses to the city.“The success of having two international solar firms investing in Surprise has spurred additional development,” said Mike Hoover, Surprise Economic Development supervisor.Intrepid Tool Industries and Southwest Products are both located near the Rio and Gestamp projects and have created hundreds of new jobs filled by area residents, Hoover said.Gestamp Solar Steel expanded its Surprise facility which makes parts for solar power plants, and added approximately 80 jobs.

  • RCSC offers inaugural Mother’s Day brunch

    The Recreation Centers of Sun City is hosting for the first time a Mother’s Day Brunch May 11 on the patio at Lakeview Recreation Center.The catered event, complete with linens, china and crystal, will include a chef-staffed carving station with prime rib, honey cured ham and cranberry-sage roulade along with create-your-own-omelets cooked to order. There will also be bacon, sausage, French toast, pancakes, a salad bar and a dessert station.The full menu and tickets are available at the Lakeview Clubs Office. Tickets, which must be purchased in advance, are $45 per person and include tax and gratuity.Reserved seating is limited to 250 tickets.Brunch will be served from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Lakeview, 10626 W. Thunderbird Blvd. in Sun City.

  • Lakeview club does more than create beauty

    The Lakeview Ceramics and Porcelain Club is reaching out to teachers across the Valley this year.The club is donating buttons, toilet paper rolls, coffee tins and more to Treasures for Teachers, a non-profit group that provides teachers in Arizona with reuseable resources.“I think it’s a neat program; it’s something that all teachers are doing nowadays, spending money out of their own pockets. So we decided to help them out,” said Eileen Afdahl, chairwoman of the porcelain room.Treasures for Teachers began in 2004 with the goal to support as many educators across Arizona as possible.While the project is an important one for the group, the Lakeview Ceramics and Porcelain Club’s regular goal is to offer group members a chance to create everything from holiday ornaments to tea sets and more using one of five kilns.“We would like to get men to join because we have heavy molds that need lifting sometimes,” said Pat Johnson, vice president of the organization.

  • West Valley ‘Go Green’ governments practice what they preach

    • Third in a seriesThe effort to “go green” can mean a lot of things but to municipalities and other local governing bodies that is especially true. Just about all the ways that things can be made more environmentally friendly are options for West Valley governments, from buildings to landscaping and beyond.“The city has moved to a new LEED building standard for our own construction,” said Peoria Mayor Bob Barrett. “Our new courthouse, community center and stadium clubhouse improvements are an example of this.”Barrett said the sustainability policy affects the entire community.“Many of our community partners are greening their organizations,” he said. “Peoria Unified School District has adopted solar as have car dealerships, department stores and commercial buildings.”Surprise spokeswoman Diane Arthur said the city has been working in the past several years to commit to sustainability.

  • Firefighters hail gains fighting wildland blazes

    Firefighters assured the Sun City West Fire District board this week that steps have been taken to improve safety following last year’s Yarnell blaze that killed 19.That assurance came a week after Sun City West Fire District chairman David Wilson said he was concerned about committing district personnel to wildland firefighting until he was convinced improvements had been made.This week, Wilson changed his position after learning at the budget workshop that Assistant Chief Tim Van Scoter is part of the Wildland Advisory Committee for the Arizona Fire Chiefs Association. Van Scoter spoke about the need for equipment on the brush trucks and continued training, which would cost an estimated $7,314.The board also heard from Darby Starr, who was an engine boss last wildfire season.After 20 years in wildland firefighting, Starr said he thinks the state is taking the appropriate response.Starr said this year bigger teams will be deployed to wildland fires. He noted that in a Sierra Vista fire last week that covered 300 acres, a Type 1 team was assigned, “just because of the possible threat of it.”

  • Fire district examines name change

    With the Sun City West Fire District annexing areas outside of Sun City West, board members have recognized the potential need for a name change.Board Chairman David Wilson said some in the community believe the name doesn’t apply due to the district’s expanding jurisdiction.Fire Chief Robert Biscoe said during a recent district workshop meeting that “the question was always there as to whether or not the current name of the district is truly representative of who we serve, and what we do?” And since the district represents a larger regional system, “we feel that it’s important the name reflect the entire region” and also represent the “largest amount of work the district does on a day-in and day-out basis.”Biscoe said fire departments are now adding “rescue” or “medical” to their names. Eighty percent of what the fire department does is EMS and the fire district’s name doesn’t address that, he said.In Surprise, for example, it’s Surprise Fire-Medical Department.“The last thing we want to do is separate ourselves from the community of Sun City West,” which has always been and will continue to be the “vital core area of the district,” but Biscoe questioned if the name is “properly representative of who the district serves?”

  • West Valley ‘Go Green’ governments practice what they preach

    • Third in a seriesThe effort to “go green” can mean a lot of things but to municipalities and other local governing bodies that is especially true. Just about all the ways that things can be made more environmentally friendly are options for West Valley governments, from buildings to landscaping and beyond.“The city has moved to a new LEED building standard for our own construction,” said Peoria Mayor Bob Barrett. “Our new courthouse, community center and stadium clubhouse improvements are an example of this.”Barrett said the sustainability policy affects the entire community.“Many of our community partners are greening their organizations,” he said. “Peoria Unified School District has adopted solar as have car dealerships, department stores and commercial buildings.”Surprise spokeswoman Diane Arthur said the city has been working in the past several years to commit to sustainability.

  • Glendale business celebrates anniversary

    Jim McKenna Farmers Insurance Agency will host a 20th anniversary party from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday in its office parking lot, 17235 N. 75th Ave., Suite E160 in Glendale.The party will feature live music from the local 50s band, Come Back Buddy.  In addition to live music, visitors are welcome to enjoy refreshments and raffles with prizes from various local businesses in the area.  For information, call 623-334-1800.

  • Coyotes on right financial track with new owners

    GLENDALE, Ariz. (AP) — Anthony LeBlanc lived out a dream by becoming the owner of the Phoenix Coyotes. All that was missing was a trip to the playoffs. LeBlanc and the rest of IceArizona purchased the team from the NHL last summer and, despite short preparation time, met most of their financial goals in their first season as owners, including a franchise record for ticket revenue. On the ice, Phoenix came up just short, missing the playoffs by two points thanks to a seven-game losing streak late in the season. LeBlanc said he expects some changes on the roster, but doesn't believe there needs to be an overhaul since the Coyotes were so close and had injuries to key players, including captain Shane Doan and goalie Mike Smith.

  • West Valley communities generate ideas to save, help Mother Nature

    In addition to going green with solar and other construction themselves, local governments are also overhauling vehicles and helping their residents to make changes, too, and they are doing so in a variety of ways.In Surprise, water-conservation programs regularly run on the city’s Channel 11, where Master Gardeners discuss proper landscape watering techniques and plant choices for a desert climate and tutorials on how to properly use your irrigation system. The city’s Green Surprise website is also a wealth of information, including water conservation tips, air quality information and even a video tutorial on how to make your home more energy efficient.The city is also committing heavily to water conservation efforts, and just last month city council created a new Water Planning Subcommittee, chaired by Vice Mayor Skip Hall and joined by Councilmembers John Williams and Roland Winters. The subcommittee is in the process of researching and reviewing water policy issues, so that they can make recommendations to City Council on topics such as conservation and utilization.The city is also pushing for more mass transit options for West Valley residents, whether that be a circulator system in the city or additional bus rapid transit along the Grand Avenue Corridor. This would have the dual benefit of adding more convenient travel options and of reducing emissions on the road.In Sun City West, the community’s Solar Initiative has brought a number of cost-saving projects on line, including a photovoltaic solar project on the roof of Echo Mesa Maintenance Yard, which was installed in July 2011. That project generates enough electricity to power the entire maintenance yard, officials said.In an effort to keep pools cleaner and cost less to operate, Recreation Centers of Sun City officials said they have installed UV lighting at pools, which, they said, drastically reduces chemicals in the pools.

  • PUSD board establishes 2014-15 fees

    The Peoria Unified School District Governing Board recently approved cafeteria meal prices and fee schedules for the 2014-15 school year.The cafeteria meal prices are as follows:• Elementary school breakfast - $1.50• Elementary school lunch - $2.50• High school breakfast - $1.75• High school lunch - $2.75

  • Peoria sponsors chess tourney

    The city of Peoria’s commitment to youth education will continue this year as Peoria will host its annual Governor’s Cup statewide chess tournament for K-12 players at Peoria High School on Saturday and Sunday.The Governor’s Cup designation began in 1998 when Peoria sponsored its first statewide chess invitational.Then Gov. Jane Hull signed a resolution to celebrate the event that was also attended by world champion Garry Kasparov.Winning high school seniors have been awarded savings bonds to help further their college education.Times and registration are posted at Chessemporium.com.Visitors are welcome.

  • Flake reports progress on immigration reform

    Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake told a packed house in Peoria Wednesday that progress is being made on immigration reform, saying the nation must “deal humanely and rationally with those who are already here.”Speaking to a predominantly Hispanic audience during a town hall at the Rock of Ages Ministry, the senator said he has been “concerned about immigration for years, and my familiarity and thoughts on this topic go back long before my time in office.“I grew up on a ranch in Snowflake. I worked right next to migrant labor, many of whom were here illegally. I saw what brought them here. Since that time I cannot work up any hostility for those who came here to make their lives better.”Flake said his position on immigration is that a sensible solution needs to be reached, without posturing and without villifying those who do not deserve it.“Not everyone is coming here with pure motives, and we need to be concerned about that,” he said. “But certainly the vast majority who come do so to make a better life for their families.”Flake said it is not as simple as saying enforce the law as it is written, just do a better job of it, and everything will work out.

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